Reconciled


by  Mike Ratliff

13 But now in Christ Jesus you who formerly were far off have been brought near by the blood of Christ. 14 For He Himself is our peace, who made both groups into one and broke down the barrier of the dividing wall, 15 by abolishing in His flesh the enmity, which is the Law of commandments contained in ordinances, so that in Himself He might make the two into one new man, thus establishing peace, 16 and might reconcile them both in one body to God through the cross, by it having put to death the enmity. Ephesians 2:13-16 (NASB) 

13 νυνὶ δὲ ἐν Χριστῷ Ἰησοῦ ὑμεῖς οἵ ποτε ὄντες μακρὰν ἐγενήθητε ἐγγὺς ἐν τῷ αἵματι τοῦ Χριστοῦ. 14 Αὐτὸς γάρ ἐστιν ἡ εἰρήνη ἡμῶν, ὁ ποιήσας τὰ ἀμφότερα ἓν καὶ τὸ μεσότοιχον τοῦ φραγμοῦ λύσας, τὴν ἔχθραν ἐν τῇ σαρκὶ αὐτοῦ, 15 τὸν νόμον τῶν ἐντολῶν ἐν δόγμασιν καταργήσας, ἵνα τοὺς δύο κτίσῃ ἐν αὐτῷ εἰς ἕνα καινὸν ἄνθρωπον ποιῶν εἰρήνην 16 καὶ ἀποκαταλλάξῃ τοὺς ἀμφοτέρους ἐν ἑνὶ σώματι τῷ θεῷ διὰ τοῦ σταυροῦ, ἀποκτείνας τὴν ἔχθραν ἐν αὐτῷ. Ephesians 2:13-16 (NA28)

The term “reconciled’ is a wonderful word. the Greek is ἀποκαταλλάσσω (apokatallassō). In Ephesians 2:16 (above) the word “reconcile” translates ἀποκαταλλάξῃ (apokatallaxē) the third singular, aorist active subjunctive case of ἀποκαταλλάσσω. The usage of this word in the New Testament is to exchange hostility for friendship. We find this word in the passage I shared above and in Colossians 1:20,21. This Greek preposition adds the idea of “back.” Therefore, ἀποκαταλλάσσω means “to bring back to a former state of harmony.” Continue reading